Meditative Practices, 10 Reasons Why You Should have one.

Stress Less: In this day and age, stress is one of the number one complaints that people have. But stress is not just a daily annoyance; it is a real problem that can have serious—even deadly—consequences on your health. You may have heard the expression “Stress Kills,” and it is an unfortunate truth. Stress hormones take a tremendous toll on your body. Luckily mindfulness has been scientifically proven to reduce stress and increase mental and physical health.

Improve Mental Focus: Does it ever feel like you just can’t turn off your brain? We all have mental chatter that can distract us when we need to focus on work, school, or other important activities. Meditative practices are specially designed to train your mind to focus when you need it to, which will help you to direct your train of thought in the right direction.

Connect With Your Loved Ones: It might seem counterintuitive that internal practices of mindfulness and self-awareness could help you to connect to someone outside of yourself, but they can do just that because they allow you to get in touch with yourself through mental focus and attention. This translates into interpersonal relationships, and over time, you will find that it will become easier give your loved ones your full, undivided attention.

Reduce Pain: Pain is something that we all have to deal with from time to time. But dealing with chronic mental or physical pain can leave you exhausted on all levels—mentally, physically, and emotionally. Mindfulness can enable you to change your relationship to the pain you are experiencing and free up mental energy for the life you want to lead.

Sleep Better: Getting the sleep your body needs can improve your mental and physical health. Inadequate sleep leaves you in a state of constant fatigue, and insomnia can exacerbate this problem, creating a vicious cycle that can be hard to escape. Meditative practices can be a solution, as they give you the tools you need to get restful, restorative sleep each and every night. These techniques can also help you fight insomnia so that you can fall asleep quickly and break the cycle of exhaustion.

Lose Weight: It may sound too good to be true, but let me explain. Meditation can actually help you to lose weight and keep it off. This is because, as previously discussed, meditative practices reduce stress and improve sleep, and both stress and fatigue can cause weight gain and difficulty controlling appetite. In addition, mindfulness and visualizations can empower you to finally reach your ideal weight and increase your physical stamina.

Achieve Your Goals: Weight loss isn’t the only goal that meditation can assist you in attaining. Whether your goals are personal or professional, visualization is a powerful tool that can increase your motivation and drive to succeed. When you have this mental toolbox in place, you will find that you have a nearly unlimited capacity for success, as your daily practice consistently renews your motivation to achieve.

Increase Self-Confidence: Have you ever watched someone who conducted themselves with such poise that they could gain the attention of everyone in the room with only their self. Meditation can actually work to help you begin to be perceived as confident and in control. Your newfound mental composure can enable you to be assertive, make new connections with ease, and feel good about the decisions you make.

Be Inspired: It’s no secret that our innate creativity is often blocked from within our own minds. For example, for a writer, this can take the form of what’s commonly known as writer’s block. In fact, nearly everyone has experienced this frustrating lack of inspiration. Mindfulness is a great way to remove our own mental blockages and tap into the creativity naturally flowing within us in order to achieve great things, whether in science, art, or another field.

Find Peace: Along with the mental clarity you gain from your mindfulness practice, you will find that you attain a state of inner peace and calm. You will gain perspective about what is most important to you, and gratitude will begin to flow through your life as you recognize the incredible opportunities you do have, in spite of any setbacks. Mindfulness brings your awareness to the richness of everything that life has to offer.

Laura Zukerman

The Goddess Bibles

A Memoir By LZ

Our Mind and Body Are Connected the As If Method

Our mind and body are connected. It’s true. Although many people think that they are separate, they actually hold great influence over each other. When you work on one aspect of self, you impact the other. Let me explain this. Have you ever felt really nervous? I know I have. Your mind may race, and your nerves jangle and these thoughts and feelings manifest on a physical level too. Have you ever experienced that dry mouth and headache when you were nervous and worried about what was to come?


It’s important to understand the mind and body connection. Let’s say you are waiting to be interviewed for a job and you become so nervous and are worried about your abilities. Let’s face it. It’s easy to be plagued by qualms and to start running a negative script in your mind. But think back to that experience, I bet it wasn’t just your mind that was affected but your body too. You may have felt a little nauseous while your tummy did somersaults and maybe, you even started sweating a bit. This proves that your thoughts and your emotions affect you on a physical level.

“If you feel stressed or have unresolved issues, they will only play havoc with your mind and body. If thoughts are negative, you really must identify and resolve them as it could lead to unhealthy behaviors and, you may even find you become unwell or ill. Of course, I am not implying that every single illness or accident that occurs is because of your mindset, but believe me, it plays a significant role. If you can understand this, you will be able to take greater control of your life.


Try thinking of your life as a big jigsaw puzzle, this really worked for me. I looked at each aspect of my life, breaking key elements into smaller pieces. I did this and learned that each part of my life had a significant role to play. When one part didn’t function well, it affected everything else. You cannot ignore the importance of your thoughts and feelings and how they manifest within the physical body.


Repressed memories may suddenly manifest into thoughts. When this happens, these are powerful and can have a far-reaching effect. It is important to deal with repressed emotions and seriously, having awareness gives you an advantage.

“When I was trying out As If, I took the time to think about my learned behaviors, those gleaned through parental advice or, through witnessing behaviors. I also looked at my personal experiences. I did this because when events occur, we react by way of information and experiences, these become reference points for our actions. If you can change these behaviors or experiences, if you can use As If to make your response to any situation more positive, boy, will you notice a significant difference. Simply, it becomes a reference point for your mind.
As If can be used at any time and in any place.


Let’s consider that you have some seriously challenging situations ahead of you. You may feel unconfident and doubtful and in some cases, perhaps that dreaded job interview, you may even be filled with dread. If you can tap into the ‘As If’ system and start to act as if you are confident, your thoughts will naturally become more positive. You’ll visualize strong images of how you want to think and act.
Once you start to feel more confident, your actions become instinctive and learned.”

“You’ll learn to understand your thoughts and be in control, readily identifying the inner two-way communication and making it work for you. Let’s be clear here. Your mind is powerful, and once you tame your thoughts and use your mind in the best way possible, you’ll improve your life.”

“When you are alert and ready for anything in life, your posture is also likely to be good. When you are less than alert or feeling down, you are likely to adopt poor posture. Try adjusting your posture, do it right now, sit up straight and pull those shoulders back. I bet you start to feel better immediately.


There have been many experiments into body language and so this is not me just saying it. Psychologists discovered that emotions may also have a strong connection with specific body postures. During these experiments, people were asked to generate a strong negative emotion – let’s use fear as an example and to place their body in a position that for them, depicted fear. When they had done so, they were asked to remain in this position but to also try to generate happiness, they found it much harder to do so. So, this links body posture to emotions.
It’s impossible to not get stressed from time to time.

We all know that life is stressful at times, but, the lesson of the day is that it’s how you deal with it that is the most important. Have you ever noticed that some people do not seem to react to daily stressors? They just deal with it… right? Think about a time when you have felt highly stressed and perhaps the outcome was not so good. Afterwards, we often have to deal with regret or, kick ourselves when we respond badly, but our responses are fueled by our learned behaviors, our thoughts and feelings. When using body language, breathing techniques and As If, we can change our actions.


If you had to face a similarly difficult situation next time, and used the ‘as if’ process, you would be able to outwardly project very different emotions, feelings and actions and, nip any damaging thoughts in the bud.”

The Goddess Bibles

A Memoir By Laura Zukerman

The Concept of Mindfulness

Mindfulness

The concept of mindfulness comes to us from the Eastern cultures, and particularly from Buddhism — concepts that are over 2,500 years old. Its simple objective is to take you into a dynamic focus and lead you to fully paying attention. You pay attention to what is going on around you, to which emotions you are feeling, to how and what you are saying to others, to how and what you are thinking silently within your own mind, to how you are acting and behaving out in the world either alone or amongst others.

See how this ties into developing your EQ? It’s great!

In our Western societies, mindfulness courses and classes have mushroomed only over the past four decades or so. Mindfulness is now a mainstream concept and practice in Europe and North America. In fact, it’s not far off track to say that many Westerners eased into full meditation practice through the doorway of mindfulness practice.

The Western medical and mental health communities, at the same time, came to adapt Eastern mindfulness practices and approaches to their own needs; They have indeed been shown over time to help patients who have mental and emotional health[…]”

“Western psychology and psychiatry have also devised some more “Westerner-friendly” ways of learning and practicing mindfulness.; Medical professionals have assisted their patients in becoming more mindful, and seen it notably help reduce symptoms of depression, stress and anxiety, among others.

Versions of mindfulness and EQ that we see in these pages have also been extremely useful in diminishing or fully eliminating emotional trauma. Trauma from wartime experiences, from childhood or adult physical abuse or violence result in negative, protective feelings moving into place in our psyche. Whether it manifests as recurring nightmares or sleepless nights in fear of terrible nightmares, a strong anxiety around certain personality types, or a panicky retreat from society altogether – such strong feelings and emotions associated with trauma can be released through mindfulness practice. Knowing how to let go of the feelings helps diminish the power of the related memory as well. Military personnel returning from war zones and benefiting from a mindful release of traumatic feelings have gone so far as to state, “I finally got my life back”.”

“Determination. Awareness. Attention.

These are three key words that help you understand what mindfulness is.

Mindfulness means deliberately paying attention. Intentionally focusing. Nonjudgmentally observing life and living as it occurs around you. Being aware of your surroundings through all your senses.

If you are not paying attention, you don’t know whether you are missing out on something that matters to you! You can only decide what matters to you by giving attention to everything, and then prioritizing.

Mindfulness is a useful state from which to observe what’s going on within self, within other people, and out in the world at large. You pay attention to:

  • What is going on around you.
  • Which emotions you are experiencing.
  • How you are talking to people and what you are saying.
  • How people are talking to you and what they are saying.
  • Body language – yours and others’.
  • What others are doing and what they need.
  • How and what you are thinking.
  • How, how much and what you eat and drink and take into the body.
  • Nature – sounds, colors and movement.
  • And much more!

In other words, mindfulness is a dynamic state of awareness. It is a lively, conscious way of registering and processing information.

“This awareness of what is going on from moment to moment occurs without any judgement on your part.

We have all noticed young children engrossed in a given task. Nothing can pull their attention from it. They are creating some form of art, or building something, or they’re lost in a beloved story that they know by heart. We as adults can go into “the zone”, too! We are similarly experiencing a mindful absorption in the activity we are performing: running a long distance, reading an engrossing novel, lost in kneading the bread dough. Nearly no interference, noise or interruption seems to be able to break our focus. As the saying goes, “wild horses couldn’t pull us away.”

Millennia-old religious and spiritual practices have used some type of mindfulness technique from their very beginnings. Rites often blended them into practices. Prayer, singing hymns or chanting are nothing more than means of focusing – being mindful – on the spiritual energy and connection with the divine. Meditation (and mindfulness is part of achieving that quiet mind) is a spiritual aspect of many religions, including the Baha’i faith, Buddhism, Daoism, Hinduism, Jainism and Sikhism. By practicing mindfulness as we present it here, you are joining centuries of practitioners.

“That being said, sustained mindfulness is a tall order for most people! It means you have to pause and pay attention to absolutely everything going on around you and within you. That’s a lot to ask of anyone caught in the hustle-bustle of modern life. It’s a lot to ask as we are traveling, running businesses and earning a living, raising families, managing our homes.

Being mindful is difficult for the busy person that you are, granted. Especially with our last two or three decades of increasing solicitation by technology, media and the devices we all carry around to communicate, it’s hard to let go of that (apparent) connection and just observe attentively with our five senses for a while. We just don’t like to stop! But stop is exactly what we must do if we are to practice mindfulness and reap the benefits of doing so.

Becoming mindful means that most of us have to learn brand-new habits. Anyone can develop a more mindful state of being. Indeed, throughout the centuries, a number of specific activities have helped humans become fully aware and stay in the moment: Yoga, many martial arts such as Aikido, Chi Gong or Tai Chi, and meditation are some of the ancient ways we have moved ourselves into mindfulness. The ancients who lived with attention and determination were able to move into deeper, more sustained and long-term mindful states, as they quieted the noise of the ordinary mind and observed the world from a more peaceful state (7).

15th century poet Kabir said, “Wherever you are, that is the entry point.”

That is an important comment to keep in mind, because the first-time practitioner of mindfulness (and meditation as a whole) will get frustrated by wondering where to start.”

The Goddess Bibles

A Memoir By

Laura Zukerman