Meditative Practices, 10 Reasons Why You Should have one.

Stress Less: In this day and age, stress is one of the number one complaints that people have. But stress is not just a daily annoyance; it is a real problem that can have serious—even deadly—consequences on your health. You may have heard the expression “Stress Kills,” and it is an unfortunate truth. Stress hormones take a tremendous toll on your body. Luckily mindfulness has been scientifically proven to reduce stress and increase mental and physical health.

Improve Mental Focus: Does it ever feel like you just can’t turn off your brain? We all have mental chatter that can distract us when we need to focus on work, school, or other important activities. Meditative practices are specially designed to train your mind to focus when you need it to, which will help you to direct your train of thought in the right direction.

Connect With Your Loved Ones: It might seem counterintuitive that internal practices of mindfulness and self-awareness could help you to connect to someone outside of yourself, but they can do just that because they allow you to get in touch with yourself through mental focus and attention. This translates into interpersonal relationships, and over time, you will find that it will become easier give your loved ones your full, undivided attention.

Reduce Pain: Pain is something that we all have to deal with from time to time. But dealing with chronic mental or physical pain can leave you exhausted on all levels—mentally, physically, and emotionally. Mindfulness can enable you to change your relationship to the pain you are experiencing and free up mental energy for the life you want to lead.

Sleep Better: Getting the sleep your body needs can improve your mental and physical health. Inadequate sleep leaves you in a state of constant fatigue, and insomnia can exacerbate this problem, creating a vicious cycle that can be hard to escape. Meditative practices can be a solution, as they give you the tools you need to get restful, restorative sleep each and every night. These techniques can also help you fight insomnia so that you can fall asleep quickly and break the cycle of exhaustion.

Lose Weight: It may sound too good to be true, but let me explain. Meditation can actually help you to lose weight and keep it off. This is because, as previously discussed, meditative practices reduce stress and improve sleep, and both stress and fatigue can cause weight gain and difficulty controlling appetite. In addition, mindfulness and visualizations can empower you to finally reach your ideal weight and increase your physical stamina.

Achieve Your Goals: Weight loss isn’t the only goal that meditation can assist you in attaining. Whether your goals are personal or professional, visualization is a powerful tool that can increase your motivation and drive to succeed. When you have this mental toolbox in place, you will find that you have a nearly unlimited capacity for success, as your daily practice consistently renews your motivation to achieve.

Increase Self-Confidence: Have you ever watched someone who conducted themselves with such poise that they could gain the attention of everyone in the room with only their self. Meditation can actually work to help you begin to be perceived as confident and in control. Your newfound mental composure can enable you to be assertive, make new connections with ease, and feel good about the decisions you make.

Be Inspired: It’s no secret that our innate creativity is often blocked from within our own minds. For example, for a writer, this can take the form of what’s commonly known as writer’s block. In fact, nearly everyone has experienced this frustrating lack of inspiration. Mindfulness is a great way to remove our own mental blockages and tap into the creativity naturally flowing within us in order to achieve great things, whether in science, art, or another field.

Find Peace: Along with the mental clarity you gain from your mindfulness practice, you will find that you attain a state of inner peace and calm. You will gain perspective about what is most important to you, and gratitude will begin to flow through your life as you recognize the incredible opportunities you do have, in spite of any setbacks. Mindfulness brings your awareness to the richness of everything that life has to offer.

Laura Zukerman

The Goddess Bibles

A Memoir By LZ

Altered States of Consciousness without drugs

“Although the use of psychoactive drugs can easily and profoundly change our experience of consciousness, we can also—and often more safely—alter our consciousness without drugs. These altered states of consciousness are sometimes the result of simple and safe activities, such as sleeping, watching television, exercising, or working on a task that intrigues us. In this section we consider the changes in consciousness that occur through hypnosis, sensory deprivation, and meditation, as well as through other non-drug-induced mechanisms.

“Changing Behavior Through Suggestion: The Power of Hypnosis


Franz Anton Mesmer (1734–1815) was an Austrian doctor who believed that all living bodies were filled with magnetic energy. In his practice, Mesmer passed magnets over the bodies of his patients while telling them their physical and psychological problems would disappear. The patients frequently lapsed into a trancelike state (they were said to be “mesmerized”) and reported feeling better when they awoke (Hammond, 2008). [1]


Although subsequent research testing the effectiveness of Mesmer’s techniques did not find any long-lasting improvements in his patients, the idea that people’s experiences and behaviors could be changed through the power of suggestion has remained important in psychology. James Braid, a Scottish physician, coined the term hypnosis in 1843, basing it on the Greek word for sleep (Callahan, 1997). [2]

“Hypnosis is a trance-like state of consciousness, usually induced by a procedure known as hypnotic induction, which consists of heightened suggestibility, deep relaxation, and intense focus (Nash & Barnier, 2008). [3] Hypnosis became famous in part through its use by Sigmund Freud in an attempt to make unconscious desires and emotions conscious and thus able to be considered and confronted (Baker & Nash, 2008). [4]


Because hypnosis is based on the power of suggestion, and because some people are more suggestible than others, these people are more easily hypnotized. Hilgard (1965) [5] found that about 20% of the participants he tested were entirely unsusceptible to hypnosis, whereas about 15% were highly responsive to it. The best participants for hypnosis are people who are willing or eager to be hypnotized, who are able to focus their attention and block out peripheral awareness, who are open to new experiences, and who are capable of fantasy (Spiegel, Greenleaf, & Spiegel, 2005). [6]

“People who want to become hypnotized are motivated to be good subjects, to be open to suggestions by the hypnotist, and to fulfill the role of a hypnotized person as they perceive it (Spanos, 1991). [7] The hypnotized state results from a combination of conformity, relaxation, obedience, and suggestion (Fassler, Lynn, & Knox, 2008). [8] This does not necessarily indicate that hypnotized people are “faking” or lying about being hypnotized. Kinnunen, Zamansky, and Block (1994) [9] ”

“used measures of skin conductance (which indicates emotional response by measuring perspiration, and therefore renders it a reliable indicator of deception) to test whether hypnotized people were lying about having been hypnotized. Their results suggested that almost 90% of their supposedly hypnotized subjects truly believed that they had been hypnotized.

“One common misconception about hypnosis is that the hypnotist is able to “take control” of hypnotized patients and thus can command them to engage in behaviors against their will. Although hypnotized people are suggestible (Jamieson & Hasegawa, 2007), [10] they nevertheless retain awareness and control of their behavior and are able to refuse to comply with the hypnotist’s suggestions if they so choose (Kirsch & Braffman, 2001). [11] In fact, people who have not been hypnotized are often just as suggestible as those who have been (Orne & Evans, 1965). [12]

“Another common belief is that hypnotists can lead people to forget the things that happened to them while they were hypnotized. Hilgard and Cooper (1965)[13] investigated this question and found that they could lead people who were very highly susceptible through hypnosis to show at least some signs of posthypnotic amnesia (e.g., forgetting where they had learned information that had been told to them while they were under hypnosis), but that this effect was not strong or common.

“Some hypnotists have tried to use hypnosis to help people remember events, such as childhood experiences or details of crime scenes, that they have forgotten or repressed. The idea is that some memories have been stored but can no longer be retrieved, and that hypnosis can aid in the retrieval process. But research finds that this is not successful: People who are hypnotized and then asked to relive their childhood act like children, but they do not accurately recall the things that occurred to them in their own childhood (Silverman & Retzlaff, 1986). [14] Furthermore, the suggestibility produced through hypnosis may lead people to erroneously recall experiences that they did not have (Newman & Baumeister, 1996). [15] Many states and jurisdictions have therefore banned the use of hypnosis in criminal trials because the “evidence” recovered through hypnosis is likely to be fabricated and inaccurate.

“Hypnosis is also frequently used to attempt to change unwanted behaviors, such as to reduce smoking, overeating, and alcohol abuse. The effectiveness of hypnosis in these areas is controversial, although at least some successes have been reported. Kirsch, Montgomery, and Sapirstein (1995) [16] found that that adding hypnosis to other forms of therapies increased the effectiveness of the treatment, and Elkins and Perfect (2008) [17] reported that hypnosis was useful in helping people stop smoking. Hypnosis is also effective in improving the experiences of patients who are experiencing anxiety disorders, such as PTSD (Cardena, 2000; Montgomery, David, Winkel, Silverstein, & Bovbjerg, 2002),[18] and for reducing pain (Montgomery, DuHamel, & Redd, 2000; Paterson & Jensen, 2003). [19]

Love ❤️

Laura Zukerman

Owner and Founder

At The Goddess Bibles, A Memoir

Everything That You Perceive, Think, Feel and Focus on changes your Brain

Whatever you focus on , care about and or worry or obsess about becomes the more prominent neurological factor in your brain. Furthermore , everything that you think, feel, decide , do or do not do changes your brain. This is whether you want it to or not.

Then, your default reaction becomes whatever is locked in your mind at that generated interval of time. Then, sometimes you just can’t turn that burning switch off. This is if you don’t take

Your brain does not develop strong synapses which are pathways to experiencing full emotion, unless it begins to see something habitually forming. what you do constantly is what will become wired into your brain neurologically.

Connections that are less active will receive less nerve growth. In turn, your nerves will begin to deteriorate. This is kind of like the idea of plants that don’t have enough fertilizer or water based in them on a daily basis.

When you contemplate on your sufferings, especially your past vulnerability; that you can’t prevent because it already happened. This causes the brain to increasingly focus on the suffering and the pain.

If you rely on the automatic reactions that are embedded in your habitual brain, aka the subconscious mind frame. This therefore, will help you react automatically to new events, new ideas, new pleasures, even if this reaction is denying you in some aspects.

If you train your brain to think about some hurt from the past, it will stay there. This isn’t about ignoring our past, it’s about ignoring the suffering that comes along with our past. What is within your power to change this in order to live to your fullest potential. Cultivate the actions that will move you toward the life that you want. This is by questioning these automatic response actions and turning them into positive thoughts.

You can’t live consciously thinking about your past. Your injustices done to you are done, leave them in the past. If you do you will become miserable. You will feel victimized by yourself, it won’t make you a great life because it can’t and never will.

Whatever you focus on becomes ingrained in your brain and makes your neurologically stronger. You can reshape your brain to respond to whatever it is that you want it to.

Wire your brain right now, know that you have choices in this life and that tomorrow is a new day. Even today, lets start on your new life, learn how to rewire your subconscious mind for its attainment.

❤️

Laura Zukerman

Owner and Founder At The Goddess Bibles A Memoir By Laura Zukerman

Becoming Your Inner Goddess

Goddess on Fire